The Effect of the John Brown's Raid Essay

618 Words 3 Pages
Abolitionism became increasingly growing in size since 1821 when William Lloyd Garrison assisted in writing an anti-slavery newspaper, The Genius of Universal Emancipation with Benjamin Lundy. In 1831 it rapidly grew in popularity when William Lloyd Garrison started The Liberator. There was an increasing start to the abolitionist’s in America. Slavery was very big in the South for growing “cash crops”, however in the North there was not a need for slaves. As a result of that the majority of the abolitionist’s inhabited the North with organized speeches, meetings, and newspapers ran. There started out only as small revolts and fights that then turned into a big deal. For example with Kansas choosing whether or not to become a free or slave …show more content…
Abolitionism became increasingly growing in size since 1821 when William Lloyd Garrison assisted in writing an anti-slavery newspaper, The Genius of Universal Emancipation with Benjamin Lundy. In 1831 it rapidly grew in popularity when William Lloyd Garrison started The Liberator. There was an increasing start to the abolitionist’s in America. Slavery was very big in the South for growing “cash crops”, however in the North there was not a need for slaves. As a result of that the majority of the abolitionist’s inhabited the North with organized speeches, meetings, and newspapers ran. There started out only as small revolts and fights that then turned into a big deal. For example with Kansas choosing whether or not to become a free or slave state. That became the biggest event up until John Brown’s Raid. The John Brown had always despised slavery, and this became his chance as an organized revolt. The effect of his raid on Harpers Ferry affected what the South thought about abolitionists and the power that they held. In the 1850’s the Kansas Civil War known as “Bleeding Kansas” was going on and John brown became involved in this war leading a small group of men. He had been fighting to create Kansas as a free state and led a raid known as the Pottawatomie Massacre in May 1856. This event was more of a show of their power than for getting revenge. With the involvement people changed their views on the abolition of slavery, “... many were losing faith in the electoral process
Open Document