The Gramscian Concept Of Hegemony

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Hegemony The translation of Gramscian concept of hegemony (egemony) in the field of culture and communication studies has been a history of “distortion, cooptation, and… betrayal of the Marxist project of radical social change that hegemony theory originally espoused” (Woodfin, 2006: p. 133). It was coined by Gramsci during his imprisonment during the fascist Italian government in the 1930s and it describes the process of moral, philosophical, and political leadership that a social group obtains with the active consent of subordinate social groups rather than direct coercion. Hegemony does not occur naturally, it should be constructed and institutionalized throughout institutions that contribute to the social order and its relations of…show more content…
"Journalism”, says Artz, Mace, and Cloud, demonstrates how norms and practices meet the needs and values of social formation (…). The construction of 'objectivity' (...) conform(s) seemessly to the time and space requirements of the business cycle, advertising requirements, and corporate profits drives (…).This (…) is the efficient implementation of a shared interest in a social system for the production of life based on private profit from wage labor, by administering political decisions and cultural practices that will reproduce existing social relations and norms" (Artz, Macek, & Cloud, 2006: p. 38-39). The ways in which news coverage portrayed and problematized the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 is a good example of how mainstream media and business journalism still playing a role in supporting and maintaining hegemony, promoting a narrow view of economy, addressing audiences as investors or as consumers, continuously portraying people as irresponsible and lazy consumers and business as usual. Overall, by framing economic and business news as a discrete, specialist, domain simultaneously reproduces the separation between economic analysis and ethical debate that characterizes mainstream economics and cements journalists' reliance on insider sources who almost all sing from the free market hymn sheet" (Murdock & Gripsrud, 2015: p. 214). The
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