The Great Consumption Of Alcohol

1812 WordsApr 27, 20178 Pages
Throughout the early-19th century, England viewed itself as a global super power and a model for how other countries should be. Most people were wealthy and lived exuberant lifestyles, along with drinking tea and doing all the fancy things now associated with English culture. Even with all the properness, there was a great consumption of alcohol. In the beginning, it began with gin and other liquors. However, since at the time water was said to be unreliable and unsanitary, so people decided to make the switch to beer. During the early 1800’s to 1830’s Beer helped to improve and shape English society and culture. Beer has been around for a long time. In fact, it dates as far back to ancient Babylonia. Babylonian society was centered around…show more content…
As a result, the British parliament passed the Gin Act of 1736, which increased the tax on gin by 400%. The hope of this bill was that the government would be able to control its citizens. However, the passage of this bill was met with heavy criticism and even rebellions. The Gin Act of 1736 affected not only the many people who lived a posh lifestyle, as part of the wealthy class, but the working class as well. The 400% increase was one which the working class could not afford. As a result, they searched for a cheaper alternative so that they could get drunk and bring them a little recreation to get them away from their daily lives. That alternative turned out to be beer, as it was a versatile good and was used for many things and proved to be so popular that people were making their own beers at home and selling them. It proved to be a necessity of daily life. With no way of regulating what they used to make the beer, parliament needed to pass a bill which only allowed the sale of beer by retailers and it told them what ingredients they could and couldn’t use. In a publication submitted to the House of Commons, Observations on a Bill to Permit the General Sale of Beer by Retail in England it was found that people would still use illegal drugs of nausea and other things of this nature. This could not be allowed by the government and they quickly moved to put these practices to a halt by passing a plethora of bills. The English government believed that
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