The Homeric World Of The Iliad

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A hero, illustrated through the majority of notable Greek works of literature, is established by a precise set of characteristics that allow them to be separated from the ordinary, and be remembered as exceptional champions. In the Homeric world of the Iliad, the essence of a true hero can be identified by their extraordinary strength, connection of divine ancestry, recognition of mortality, and a defining moment or test of strength which will either lead to their resolution or downfall. Although Achilles may not have been the most tolerant individual, in the Homeric sense of the word, he is most certainly a hero.
Achilles is notorious for his uncontrollable rage, which allows him to be recognized as a feared and ruthless warrior among
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Achilles is portrayed within the Iliad as “god like,” but he is still simply a mortal since his mother Thetis is a sea nymph, and his father Peleus is a human. This bloodline is imperative to the build of a hero since they must be able to suffer as the mortals do, but also have incredible and inhuman abilities that make them memorable. His mother 's attempt to turn him immortal by means of the river Styx is incredibly important since it failed when her fingers left the bare spots of his ankles defenseless. This certain vulnerability is what separates him from the everlasting gods, and allows him to understand human agony and emotion.
Meddlesome immortals may attempt to tamper with the outcome of the Trojan War, choosing sides and manipulating the battle as they please, but they risk relatively nothing in joining the fight since they cannot die. They are unaware of just how drastically their chaotic disputes affect humanity. Their immortality limits them from comprehending the extent of suffering the Greeks and Trojans must face, to them war is nothing more than a game, but Zeus shows but Zeus shows pity when he says that, “there is nothing alive more agonized than man of all that breathe and crawl across the earth” (457).
More precisely, although the gods may force their own will over the creatures on earth in a meaningless manner, humans have a conscious and are able to understand what is happening. However, they are
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