Essay The Impact of the Vietnam War

1061 Words5 Pages
For many Americans it is common knowledge to know about the Vietnam War; however, for some Americans the Vietnam War is ancient history, dishonorable, but irrelevant nonetheless. If people do not physically see the many horrors of war it is easy to forget; although maybe it is something we try to forget. However, there are some who may be able to forget there will be some, like politicians, that will not forget. The Vietnam War had a terrible impact on both the United States and Vietnam, and more importantly it would affect foreign policy for many years to come. It is highly debatable for what the reasons were for the Vietnam War beginning but for the most part the reason was to stop the spread of communism. Communism was on the rise and…show more content…
When Rolling Thunder failed to weaken the enemy’s will after the first several weeks the purpose of it began to change. Bombings then tended to be directed at the flow of men and supplies from the north (Karnow). Damaging as it was to the north, Ho Chi Minh still maintained the same course. Operation Rolling Thunder was a desperate attempt to convince the North Vietnamese to initiate negotiations and hopefully a ceasefire. This operation showed that LBJ was ineffective and ignorant. He was blind to the fact that the North Vietnamese were obviously going to retaliate because of Operation Rolling Thunder. The TET offensive was the retaliation of the North. The north surprised attacked many of the cities and therefore making it so that we had to activate our reserves. It was a political and psychological victory for them (Karnow), because it dramatically contradicted claims by the United States government that the war was all but over. This offensive may have been insignificant because it was a failure but it did send an intense message. Due to the ongoing offensives, controversy over the war raged on. Tensions were not only rising in Vietnam but they were also rising on American soil. Opposition to the war escalated as the casualties grew, which created divisions among people of the American society. The United States government
Open Document