The Importance Of The Civil Rights Movement

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The attainment of civil rights by African Americans was a result of inspiration and ideological guidance provided by individual black leaders but was mostly due to the planned legal actions carried out by organizations such as NAACP. Even though the leaders helped the publicity of the events, most of the work was done through local leaders who aided the advancement of civil rights. During the Civil Right movement, over 70% of African Americans were victims of discriminations, and so they looked up to someone to represent them. Martin Luther King who was willing to speak on the behalf of all African-Americans, was famous for leading the Montgomery Bus Boycott as a result of which buses could no longer be segregated under the 1957 Supreme Court ruling. At the 1963 March on Washington, King made his famous speech "I have a dream" through which he reached out to both blacks and whites by pleading that everyone should be allowed to be a part of the American Dream and share equal rights. The speech built a momentum for civil rights legislation by inspiring fellow African Americans to demand civil rights through peaceful demonstration, insisting that the March on Washington should be for jobs. However, Marcus Garvey, who is believed to give rise to the Civil Rights movement in the US, started a Pan-Africanism movement against the ill-treatment of blacks all over the world. United Negro Improvement Association and the Black Star Line were formed, thus creating stronger connections
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