The Separation Between Church And State Essay

1998 Words8 Pages
In the United States, there is supposedly a separation between church and state. However, this seems to be untrue for many circumstances in U.S. politics. The political culture in the U.S. is infused with opinions and symbolism that show candidates/ elected officials’ adherence to religious beliefs. This is especially true when officials are campaigning for elected office. Politicians try to identify with voters’ religious beliefs, especially in local elections, where one religion may be fairly dominant. Sometimes this is a cynical pitch for votes but in other cases may represent that individual’s profound beliefs which result in their political views. This is evident through politicians trying to be photographed at religious services, with famous religious leaders, or even publicly announcing their denominational affiliations. Many of our founding documents relate in some way back to God. The official motto of the U.S. is “In God We Trust,” and it is printed on U.S. paper currency. This motto relates back to Judaism and Christianity through several bible verses. These many instances show how religion has been and continues to be used in American political life. Religion in the United States has been infused in American politics since its founding and will continue to play an influential role in American democracy even though there is this “wall of separation” between church and state.
What is now the United States began with two small English Protestant settlements in
Get Access