The Tragic Hero, John Practor, in The Crucible by Arthur Miller

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John Proctor
The Crucible by Arthur Miller is set in Salem in a Puritan community. John Proctor had everything the average puritan could ever want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to spend his life with. Proctor was a guy that wasn’t afraid to speak his mind and throughout Salem he was respected and honored for it. But John wasn’t the perfect man either he had betrayed his wife and committed adultery. John Proctor is the tragic hero because he is loving, loyal, authoritative, but his tragic flaw is his temper.
John is a loving husband. He proves that by telling Elizabeth, “It is well seasoned” (p. 48) talking about the rabbit she cooked, in which he had to add salt to. He likes to make her happy,
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John shows his loyalty when he is trying to prove Elizabeth’s innocence to witchcraft. By telling the judge, “my wife is innocent!” (103).
John has an authoritative personality. John proves this authoritative personality when he goes to Reverend Paris’s house, to find out why there is talk of witchcraft in the town, and finds his servant, Mary Warren, who is not supposed to be there and she shays “Oh! I’m just going home,” knowing she isn’t supposed to be there (20). His first words to her indicate his authority, “Now get home” because she does not question him and simply does what he says she proves he has authority (20). He shows his authoritative personality when talking alone with Abigail. He tells her, “That’s done with” trying to end the conversation after she has asked for a soft word therefore showing his authority (21). He also shows his authority with Elizabeth about Mary Warren going into Salem after he had “forbid her to go.” (49) He has shown his authority over the hired help in his house. Later he shows his authority by getting the last words in an argument with Mary Warren, “Good night, then!” (57)
John Proctor’s tragic flaw is his temper. Though his pride does go along with his temper, the reason he was jailed at the end of the story was for

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