The Values Of Sense And Sensibility By Jane Austen

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Sense and Sensibility by: Jane Austen
Intoduction:
Sense and Sensibility was first published in 1811, by Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility represents the neoclassical, dualistic moral world where values and exclusion values will ultimately be successful in a painful, romantic feeling. Not only that, he was making serious cynicisms of society's eighteenth centuries in which the aristocrats were praised and indirectly influencing young people's minds, not the love of love but to betray it just for Wealth. In the novel, Lucy and Willoughby symbolize this kind of people of society
Summary:
When Mr. died Henry Dashwood, leaving all his money on the son of his first wife John Dashwood, his second wife and his three daughters left behind
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Austen is very concerned about the social environment of his characters, and his settings clearly reflect this concern. Barton is the countryside, and our main characters live in the shadow of landed gentry (the Middletons at Barton Park). It is notable that Elinor and Marianne are always out of people moving back between London and Devonshire themselves are not well, and they depend on rich connections to stay in social loop Of moderate-to-high societies. The particular Austen moment in history is an interesting one. His novels are fascinated by the unique and unusual interaction between people of different social levels - a new development in England at that time. His books are firmly planted in the bourgeoisie, a class that is up-and-up while he writes. None of his characters in Sense and Sensibility are firmly planted in the upper echelons of high society; Even the richiest are not included in noble social circles. Instead, the spaces where Dashwoods are in the middle of the class (and believe us, there are a million different levels of "middle class" running on it). His books are firmly planted in the bourgeoisie, a class that is up-and-up while he writes. None of his characters in Sense and Sensibility are firmly planted in the upper echelons of high society; Even the richiest are not included in noble social circles. Instead, the spaces where Dashwoods are in the middle of the class (and believe us, there are a million different levels of "middle class" running on it). His books are firmly planted in the bourgeoisie, a class that is up-and-up while he writes. None of his characters in Sense and Sensibility are firmly planted in the upper echelons of high society; Even the richiest are not included in noble social circles. Instead, the spaces where Dashwoods are in the middle of the class (and believe us, there are a million different levels of "middle class" running
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