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Essay about Three Versions of The Demon Lover Contain a Common Message

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All three versions of “The Demon Lover has the same common messages: to be careful in trust, be careful of the vows you make, and that the decisions of the young often come back around negatively. All three pieces exemplify these messages heavily. Of all of the works maintaining these themes, Elizabeth Bowen’s “The Demon Lover” displays these messages the most vehemently. Bowen’s version of “The Demon Lover” take on the principles of Harris’ “The Demon Lover” and makes the ideals more noticeable to the novice reader. Kathleen/Mrs. Drover is a perfect rendition of the original. She blatantly displays youth, as well as a true inability to make or remember promises made during major events in her life. It is quite peculiar that “the young…show more content…
One must read this piece multiple times before its true genius can be seen; this story is much like peeling an onion, tear-jerking hard work included. It is revealed in this story that she does not fit the common portrayal of the protagonized woman, as “[she is] thirty-four years old after all…” (Jackson 1), which clearly puts her as an outlier for her nativity and rash decisions. The Scottish Ballad “The Daemon Lover” is the most simple and direct interpretation of the concept. It is quite interesting to see that this piece still exists considering how long it took to write it down. One of the ballad’s major flaw is its consistent repetition, such as “’Now I am come for the vows you promised me, /You promised me long ago;’/’My former vows you must forgive,/For I’m a wedded wife’” (Unknown 2). All most all of the woman’s first arguments are stomped down by the rest of the story. It is interesting to note how similar “The House Carpenter” by Bob Dylan is to the original Demon Lover.
All three versions of “The Demon Lover has the same common messages: to be careful in trust, be careful of the vows you make, and that the decisions of the young often come back around negatively. All three pieces exemplify these messages heavily. Of all of the works maintaining these themes, Elizabeth Bowen’s “The Demon Lover” displays these messages the
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