Truth Revealed in Sophocles´ Oedipus the King Essay

689 Words 3 Pages
A story of fate versus free will, innocence versus guilt, and truth versus self-denial, Sophocles laces Oedipus the King with suspense through his use of dramatic irony and achieves an excellent tragedy. The drama opens and we meet Oedipus trying to figure out why his land is cursed and his people suffering. His quest to find out who has caused the downfall Thebes ultimately leads to his downfall. We learn of his triumphs as he has saved the people of Thebes by solving the riddle of the Sphinx, and so his character reflects one who has an ability to seek out the truth and also one who has the flaw of hubris. He reacts rashly when confronted by Tiresias and Creon when their revelations threaten his reality. This certainly reflects an …show more content…
A story of fate versus free will, innocence versus guilt, and truth versus self-denial, Sophocles laces Oedipus the King with suspense through his use of dramatic irony and achieves an excellent tragedy. The drama opens and we meet Oedipus trying to figure out why his land is cursed and his people suffering. His quest to find out who has caused the downfall Thebes ultimately leads to his downfall. We learn of his triumphs as he has saved the people of Thebes by solving the riddle of the Sphinx, and so his character reflects one who has an ability to seek out the truth and also one who has the flaw of hubris. He reacts rashly when confronted by Tiresias and Creon when their revelations threaten his reality. This certainly reflects an attitude of a man lacking patience and self-control. Thus we see how he could have reacted when confronted by Laius many years ago at the symbolic crossroads. It is debatable whether Oedipus could have escaped his fate—a fate that was already predetermined by the Gods. Throughout the play his character reveals how he determines his behavior that leads to his self-revelation and self-destruction. Oedipus is very confident that he knows who he is and what he represents to his people. When Creon returns from Delphi with news from the oracle, he urges Oedipus to receive the news in private, but his response is, “Speak out / speak to us all. I grieve for these, my people, / far more than I fear for my own life”(104-6). This moves works against
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