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Xerxes' Invasion

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Xerxes’ invasion of Greece was unsuccessful due to myriad causes. Being a son of a great King Darius, he was coerced to live up to his Father’s name and be as a mighty sovereign as King Darius was. Xerxes’ failure evolved around his mannerisms, as he was a man who was irresolute and need persuasion. Only after he was given that assertiveness, was he able to go forth with decisions. His tactics that he performed during the Battle of Thermopylae and the Battle of Salamis also portray Xerxes’ defeat of the invasion of Greece.
King Xerxes I was the son of King Darius the Great, arguably “the greatest monarch in all of the ancient world”1. Unlike his more successful father Darius, Xerxes’ actions did not strengthen the Persian Empire, but led
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CAIS
The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies. 1998.

Though Xerxes had a huge army, in that small space he could only use a fraction of his men at a time. Xerxes sent group after group of Persian warriors into the pass. The Greeks, who had better armor and longer spears (Sacks 246), slaughtered each group of fighters. Even Xerxes' elite legion of Immortals
The Battle of Thermopylae was very important as a delay tactic and because it made the Persians overly confident. It allowed the Athenians time to evacuate their city and send the elderly citizens and the city's treasure to the island of Salamis and the women and children to safety in Troezen while preparing the men for a naval battle (Pomeroy et al 194). After Thermopylae, Xerxes was so confident that when the Greeks sent him a message through a slave of Persian descent, he took their bait and fought a naval battle that he was not prepared for (Baker 89). A storm at Artemisium had badly damaged his fleet during the Battle of Thermopylae.
SALAMIS WAR
Xerxes was so confident with himself, that when the Greeks sent him a message through a “slave of Persian descent”, he “took their bait and fought a naval battle that he was not prepared for” (Baker 89). Despite a storm occurring at Artemisium, which had badly damaged his fleet during the Battle of Thermopylae, he still sent his ships “to the narrow straits at Salamis” (Pomeroy et al 196).
Xerxes was
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