The Poisonwood Bible Essay

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    The Poisonwood Bible

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    in the Congo. These countries may have not been aware of their influence at the time, but the outcome nonetheless was drastic. Cultural misunderstandings were the ultimate catalyst for the Congo’s destruction. In Barbara Kingsolver’s novel The Poisonwood Bible published in 1998 she exposes how cultural ignorance creates problems. With her chosen syntax, point of view, and time gap of each narrator Kingsolver exposes how close mindedness creates unfulfilled results because individuals can not adapt

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    The Poisonwood Bible: Journal #1 In The Poisonwood Bible, the novel opens with a narrative instruction, and it has an effect on the reader in one main way. The directive is meant to make the reader put him/herself in the setting of the story, and read it as if you are in the novel. In the opening paragraph, it tells us, “I want you to be its conscience, the eyes in the trees,” which is telling the reader to read the novel as if you are there (Kingsolver 5). This suggests about the novel that the

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    Throughout many novels different characters are sent to a new place to explore and find new things in life. An excellent example would be how the characters in the novel Poisonwood Bible explore a new lifestyle in the Congo. While they are there they have to learn how to adapt to a new life, and they try and teach the Congolese people how to worship the God, Jesus Christ. Even though the Congolese people may believe in different Gods, the Price family, especially Nathan feels that it is their duty

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    The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbra Kingsolver, draws the reader into the chaotic African Congo, where the Price family is dragged into on a mission of God, to help the unsaved souls of this “wasteland”. Leader of the missionary family, Nathan Price is a man who is bent on eternal salvation for all the people of the Congo –whether they want it or not– and will not quit in his mission, regardless the consequences. Price is a volatile man, as Kingsolver points out by Nathans’ religious fervor, apparent

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    Poisonwood Bible Analysis

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    traditions, or understand that some Africans are content with what they have and how things work. We label them as being poor because they do not match our preconceptions of happiness, as we believe living comfortably with others leads to happiness. Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver takes place in Belgian held Congo; Africa in the 1959 during the height of the Cold War and perfectly portrays our misconceptions through its main characters the Price Family. The Price Family consists of Nathan and Orleanna

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    Poisonwood Bible Analysis

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    In the historical fiction The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver portrays the American perspective on Africa with the use of a physical representation. In the beginning of the novel, the Price family, the protagonists and narrators, have their own perspective of their journey in a village of Kilanga which is located in South Africa in a congo. The family came with mindsets of missionaries because the father of the family, Nathan, has the desire to spread the word of God and the religion of Christianity

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    In the novel, The Poisonwood Bible, the author Barbara Kingsolver details the journey and transition of the missionary Price family from their all-american lifestyle in Georgia to the jungles of the Congo of Africa. What is most intriguing about the novel is its use of perspective in which all four daughters: Rachel, Leah, Adah, and Ruth May, along with their mother Orleanna Price narrate the story, which is divided into separate chapters depending on who is voicing their outlook. Yet, what it does

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    about helping the Congolese natives. Barbara Kingsolver wrote The Poisonwood Bible in order to shine a light on the United States’ and Belgium’s complicity in the Congo’s political turmoil. She was thought to be “one of the most controversial writers of her time” (“Barbara Kingsolver (1955-)”). Throughout many of her novels, she used allegory and satire in an attempt to open people’s eyes. More specific themes in The Poisonwood Bible include not only allegory and satire, but also cultural arrogance

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    Could you ever imagine having to uproot your family’s entire way of life to travel across the ocean to a foreign country that would not fully commit to your belief of Christianity? In Barbara Kingsolver’s intriguing novel, The Poisonwood Bible, she tells the story of a typical all American family from Bethlehem, Georgia. The readers’ are able to visualize the family’s lives being completely revised by the chain of events that takes place through their God led journey to the Congo. The Price family

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    song probably means something deep to a teenagers, and a certain thing in a book may mean something entirely different to a writer. In Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible, there are many symbols from trees to birds to gardens. The symbol of the poisonwood tree represents Nathan Price’s ignorance, pride, and cruelty. To begin, the poisonwood tree represents Nathan’s ignorance. For example, Nathan is so ignorant that he mispronounces words in Kikongo because he believes that everything he says is

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