Burma

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    Imperialism in Burma

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    Burma: a country of exceptional beauty, abundant natural resources, valuable minerals, fertile soil, and one of the healthiest climates in the tropics. Britain desired these features, so they imperialized the whole country in 1885 and imposed colonial rule throughout Burma. Imperialism is… The British benefit and hurt the country in many ways, completely changing the country forever. Western imperialism in Burma was more costly than beneficial; even though the British improved and modernized education

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    Genocide In Burma

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    The Proposed Solution to the Genocide in Burma The Rohingya or the minority group in Burma, have been persecuted by the mainly Buddhist majority since the 11th century. According to Wikipedia, King Bayinnaung of Burma, one of the country’s earliest kings, prevented and persecuted any Rohingya Muslims from celebrating prominent Islamic holidays such as Eid-ul Adha and Eid-ul Fitr. The following Burmese king, King Bodawpaya, butchered four of the Rohingya’s high-ranking religious leaders for not consuming

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    Unocal in Burma

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    discussed above also makes the moral standards that can be used to evaluate the moral decisions taken by the Unocal while investing for the Yadana project. Unocal even before undertaking the project conducted some socio-political analysis of the State of Burma. First research was conducted in 1991 by Amnesty International where they documented human rights violation and abuses against the indigenous people by the army which was controlled by SLORC. Even after receiving the report as well as the risks that

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    the consequences of abandoning their colonies without any guidance or support. Poor decolonization of Burma resulted in widespread oppression, downfall of the economy, and violation of human rights. Britain left Burma with a very weak government unable to control its own country. As a result, the democratic government was overthrown and a ruthless tyrant rose to power. Before British rule, Burma was a wealthy,

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    As Burma seeks to distance itself from China, despite Burma’s failed engagement on the energy front, India may very well be destined to be the major beneficiary. Burma has been grateful that India has focused on education, provision of technology and services, and infrastructure just as much as it has focused on energy (Maini, 2014). With all things considered, China virtually has monopoly over Burma’s offshore gas fields. Its economic and political engagement in Burma is greater than any other country

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    The land on which modern-day Myanmar stands could be traced back to Pagan Dynasty. Britain gradually took control of Myanmar in 1824. Burma was able to gain its independence from the Great Britain in 1948. Burma became a parliamentary democracy, granting autonomous states to minorities. In 1962 Union Revolutionary Council overthrew the civilian government and suspended the constitution. As a result, the country was under military rule from 1962 to 1988. The military government transitioned to a

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    Burmese cuisine Burma, also known as Myanmar, is located in the Southeast Asia and bordered by India, China, Thailand and Laos. Because of its special geographical location, Burma is a multicultural country and it has different ethnic groups like Indian, Chinese and Thai. Burmese food culture didn 't get much attention for everyone because of their history. But in fact, the Burmese food culture is very similar to the other Asian countries ' that has its very attractive features. So in order

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    Burma I argue that Wirathu of Burma’s preaching of hate-filled sermons should not be tolerated. While it is not the cause of the ethnic cleansing in Burma, his sermons can instigate violence between the Muslims and Buddhists in the country. This ignites more rationalization of the ethnic cleansing. Burma is no stranger to war or outside influence from other countries in the west, and after the Buddhists of the county fought against military rule in 2007, they won the international administration

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    The Oppressed People of Burma Essays

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    The Oppressed People of Burma Burma, like many other Southeast Asian nations, is a land of much culture and diversity of ethnic groups. Unfortunately, unlike the people of other nations, the people of Burma have been stripped of their human rights. Since the military junta had overtaken the Burmese government in 1988, the people of Burma have been among the most oppressed people in the world. The continuation of the government’s brutality has caught the attention of many outside nations around

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    political factions, such as the Red Flag Communists, the White Flag Communists, the Thirty Comrades, the Revolutionary Burma Army, and the Karen National Union. In 1962 General Ne Win and the Revolutionary Council led a military Junta that seized control of the Government. They deposed of Prime Minister U Nu and openly declared that “Parliamentary democracy was not suitable for Burma.” (Hoare 2015) The highly superstitious and oppressive leadership of Ne Win can be observed in what was labeled The Burmese

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    violence are crucial factors in understanding what motivates groups to commit such atrocious crimes. In the Rakhine State of Burma a bloody battle has emerged, placing the Rohingya population of the country in the crosshairs of violent military crackdown and discrimination by the majority Buddhist population. Due to a long complex relationship between the different groups of Burma, predominantly the muslims and buddhist, a culture of hatred has cast out those in the Rakhine State, Muslim population,

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    the rest of the world as Burma, is a basic country arranged in Southeast Asia. It was at one time a prosperous country and now is one of the poorest countries on the planet today. As showed by Thadithil, this is an ordered history of the events: "In 1886, Burma transformed into a district of English India. 1936, Burma separates from India. 1942, Japan invaded Burma. 1945, the Anti-Fascist Freedom League, drove by Aung San, deceives Japan, and helps allies reoccupy Burma. 1947, the Burmese won their

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    Introduction Than Aung is the current minister for the Ministry of Health in Burma. Than Aung is fairly new to this job; he assumed office 1 August 2014. Than Aung is preceded by Pe Thet Khin who was the minister from March 2011- July 2014. Before Aung became minister, he was the Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Health in Burma. He was also a member of the Naypidaw Council and was the Director of the Myanmar Army Medical Corps. Having such a successful career so far, his opinion is taken very

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    My reasoning behind using Burma and Chile, is that these two cases are both similar in the fact that the factions were important in demanding change, but both obtained different outcomes. The reason why I believe that Burma failed in its attempt to become a democratic state, was due to having an enormous amount of participants that were willing to die for democracy, but overall their movements lacked in quality. According to Chenoweth and Stephan, "internal disunity and the presence of multiple armed

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    Burma American Revolution

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    Burma is located in southeastern Asia and bordered by the Bay of Bengal to the south, Bangladesh and India to the north, China, Thailand, and Laos to the east. Today it is known as Myanmar and is home to more than 100 ethnic groups. Yangon is one of the largest cities in the country with the well-known temple of Shwedagon Pagoda, which houses many beautiful Buddhist relics. However, prior to this, Burma was actually a colony of Britain and suffered many human rights violations on the path to independence

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    genocide. In this article, Stanton lists ten stages that will occur in a genocide, starting with the stage of classification and ending with the stage of denial. In Burma, a sovereign state, also known as Myanmar, a minority ethnic group named the Rohingya is being discriminated by the majority of the population and the government in Burma. The Rohingya have been denied Burmese citizenship since 1982, when a law was enacted by the state government that excludes the Rohingya as one of Burma’s ethnic

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    The admission of Burma into ASEAN and the reluctance of ASEAN to resolve Burma’s ongoing political turmoil (the most recent, 2010 elections) have sparked off much debate and controversy among the member states as well as the international community. This is because ASEAN upheavals the non-interference principle in managing its inter-relations, indicating lack of credibility, importance and unity. Therefore, this policy memo will suggest some short and long term strategies that will re-orientate political

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    Myanmar: A Nation in Crisis Essay

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    The nation of Myanmar, also known as Burma, is currently under the rule of a ruthless totalitarian regime, guilty of numerous human rights violations and target of intense international criticism. Located in Southeast Asia, on the western border of Thailand and Laos, it has been under military rule since World War II. Burma is mired in socioeconomic crisis stemming from the rule of the military junta, and the citizens are suffering. The environment of Burma is being destroyed, the people are treated

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    Burm A And Strong People

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    as Burma switched its name to Myanmar, meaning the “fast and strong people”. Burma or Myanmar, began as individual states with several powerful monarchs, over time the British government took over. This resulted in the First Anglo-Burmese War that lasted from 1824-1826. The most respected of Myanmar’s military leaders during the war was Maha Bandula, who later died in battle. The British went on to win the war and separate Myanmar into separate colonies in favor of certain ethnicities. Burma gained

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    Rejected peoples in South Asia have been subjected ethnic cleansing as a result of newly formed nation states throughout the 20th century. Since before Burma’s independence in 1947, it is no exception. The first reports of ethnic cleansing in Burma were as early as 1978 after the Burmese military had attempted to deport the ethnic minority known as the Rohingya in neighboring Bangladesh. Since then the situation has entered a continued spiral of alleged state-sponsored oppression against the Rohingya

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