Protagoras

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  • Greek Philosophy : The And The Sophists

    1167 Words  | 5 Pages

    Devyn K. Smith Greek Philosophy Henry Schuurman I.D Number:130010 Mailbox Number: 621 Protagoras and the Sophists Throughout the history of the world, philosophy has been at the forefront of the human search for knowledge, but there is no other philosophy like ancient Greek philosophy. Ancient Greek philosophy roughly began in the sixth century BCE and continued on up until ancient Greece became apart of the Roman Empire. The great Greek philosophers of the time, like Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle

  • Protagoras

    1000 Words  | 4 Pages

    Can Virtues be Taught? Protagoras is a famous Greek wise man. He is known is the wisest man and he is from Abider. Protagoras was a sophist who moves from a city to another and give lessons. Young men liked him and wanted to be his students; however the Greek families did not like him because they think that he takes their sons from them and teaches them things that might not be compatible with the families' traditions in the ancient Greece. Socrates meets Protagoras when his friend Hippocrates

  • A Review Of Protagoras ' Epistemology

    1399 Words  | 6 Pages

    Phillips !1 Miki Phillips PHIL1050 November 19th, 2016 A Review of Protagoras’ Epistemology in the Theaetetus Plato’s Theaetetus is the transcription of a dialogue between Socrates and a philosophical prodigy: the 15 year old Theaetetus. Socrates, on the eve of his trial and eventual execution, talks with Theaetetus after being told of their resemblance by mathematician Theodorus of Cyrene. Socrates’ purpose in the dialogue becomes a discussion of epistemology, or the theory of knowledge and how

  • Socrates And Protagoras On Virtue

    1435 Words  | 6 Pages

    Socrates and Protagoras on Virtue This paper will be examining Plato’s dialogue Protagoras. Specifically, it will provide insight into Socrates’ reasons for challenging the view that virtue can be taught. Protagoras’ reply in his great speech will also be deliberated. Finally, there will also be a discussion based on these differing perspectives. Firstly, it is important to understand that Socrates was not merely arguing for virtue as being something that was not able to be taught. Socrates instead

  • Socrates vs Protagoras

    1705 Words  | 7 Pages

    from the likes of Protagoras, a self admitted sophist. In Protagoras, Socrates is depicted as a street smart, wisdom dispensing young man, brash with confidence and a bit of arrogance that goes a long way when confronted with the old school rhetoric of Protagoras. Plato begins to separate the two at the hip right from the get go. The dialogue between Socrates and his inquisitive friend Hippocrates went a long way to show that Socrates had more questions than answers about Protagoras, the sophist, especially

  • Plato Protagoras Analysis

    818 Words  | 4 Pages

    In Plato’s Protagoras, the sophist Protagoras defends his philosophy of teaching excellence from Socrates. Initially, Socrates states that the Athenians are wise, therefore they’re wise enough to run a government. With his trust in the Athenians, he proposes that virtue cannot be taught. Protagoras however, argues that the five parts of excellence can be taught. I will argue that Socrates does not believe in all the premises he puts forth, and that this reflects his opinion on the sophists, particularly

  • Essay On Protagoras And Plato

    700 Words  | 3 Pages

    What does Protagoras mean when he states that “Man is the measure of all things,” and why does Plato reject such a notion? Before we answer these questions, we must first ask ourselves, what is reality? Does the world have a reality independent of the one you and I perceive? Are qualities such as right and wrong, correct and incorrect entirely subjective? Or are they objective properties of people, places, and things? The answers to these questions are what’s at stake for both Protagoras and Plato

  • Protagoras And Moral Relativism

    2047 Words  | 9 Pages

    Protagoras is one of the leading Sophists and is most famous for the saying “Man is the measure of all things; of those that are, that they are, of those that are not, that they are not.” His statement claims that all truths are relative to the individual who hold them and that there is no absolute truth. Judgements and truths change from one person to another as the environment, the norms, and the culture change. According to Protagoras, even morality is relative and the truth of moral judgments

  • Difference Between Socrates And Protagoras

    1018 Words  | 5 Pages

    In his dialogue Protagoras, Plato presented to his audience a debate between the wise philosopher Socrates and the renowned sophist Protagoras. Throughout the course of their interaction, it became clear that the two great thinkers differed in more ways than simply their opinions on the topic at hand. Not only were philosophers and sophists inherently different in nature, but these differences were specifically illuminated when analyzing Socrates’s and Protagoras’s motives for entering their intellectual

  • Difference Between Socrates And Protagoras

    927 Words  | 4 Pages

    In his dialogue Protagoras, Plato relays to his audience a debate between the philosopher Socrates and the renowned sophist Protagoras. Throughout the course of their interaction, it becomes clear that the two men differ in more ways than simply their opinions on the topic at hand. Not only are philosophers and sophists inherently different in nature, but these differences are illuminated specifically when analyzing Socrates’s and Protagoras’s motives for entering their intellectual discussion. Moreover

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