A Commentary on, and Partial Analysis of, Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Part 4, with Especial Reference to Discourses 11 to 20

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A Commentary on, and Partial Analysis of, Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Part 4, with Especial Reference to Discourses 11 to 20

Although Zarathustra gains his happiness before the 'Fourth and Final Part' of Al Sprecht Zarathustra, that which he is most concerned with- his work, is still ahead of him in ' The Temptation of Zarathustra: an Interlude' (which Nietzsche viewed as the fourth part's "proper title in view of what already transpired and what follows" in the text as we find it abridged today). As an interlude, it bastardises the integrity of the previous three books if they are viewed as an artistic whole, and was only published in Nietzsche’s lifetime as a private run of 40 copies and only seven copies were circulated
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If the highest point of development has come with part 4's higher men, then Zarathustra must concede to this prophet of great weariness, the cipher of Schopenhauer, for whom "It is all one, nothing is worth while, the world is without meaning, knowledge chokes."3. The Schopenhauerian Prophet’s proclaimed destruction of first-order visceral passion cuts the route of Zarathustra’s would-be creation of new values. By seducing Zarathustra too pity the prophet would persuade Zarathustra to acknowledge that he shares in the prophet and higher men's unhappiness, and that his claim to happiness has been a lie. The prophet warns Zarathustra that "the waves around your mountain rise and rise... waves of great distress and affliction: soon they will lift your boat up too, and carry you away... Do you still hear nothing? Does not the sound of rushing and roaring arise from the depths?" (Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Part 4, chapter 2 The Cry of Distress). Whereupon, Zarathustra hears a long, protracted cry, thrown between abysses too hollow to contain it, and realizes it to be a human cry; "'But what is human distress to me! The ultimate sin that is reserved for me- perhaps you know what it is called?' 'Pity!' answered the prophet from an overflowing heart, and raised both hands aloft- 'O Zarathustra, I come to seduce you to your ultimate sin!'... 'why do you hide yourself? It is the Higher Man that cries for you!'" (Ibid.). Zarathustra is hoping for the high

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