A Report On The Shell Oil

1235 Words5 Pages
Naturally, there is a high demand for oil in America, after all it is a key mineral in many of the products used to keeping industrial operations running. In 2015, the United States consumed a total of 7.08 billion barrels of petroleum products, an average of about 19.4 million barrels per day. 1 Like the US, many countries would go through great lengths to acquire or keep a reliable contact to a steady oil transit. In countries like Nigeria, Colombia and Africa are a few places where, oil has been a factor in conflict over a region, starting wars over the land that harbors oil. In cases like Nigeria, where a vast amount of petroleum was discovered, there is an export of about 12 million barrels of oil a day from Nigeria. The effects have…show more content…
The documentary makes it known that there are few animals left in the congo, and states the facts of the number of animals that are pouched, all while introducing you to the few animals in the rangers protection. In the film, the SOCO oil company was accused of offering bribes to park rangers, but these allegations were denied by the company after the film was released. The filmmakers also create a sense of juxtaposition in the film. They showcase the good parts of Virunga park, alongside, the conflict with the M23 rebellion group and the oil companies. The different emerging source of conflict shown alongside the progress of Virunga Park emphasizes the importance of protecting the land and animals. The ideas presented in the documentary seem to do have a call for attention to the animal protection and land preservation, which is important to the park rangers. lands for oil. Not all oil companies are at fault when it comes to the negative effects that come with the over mining involved in the oil industry. Some oil companies are implementing certain measures to address these impacts, corporate social responsibility activities largely remain piecemeal and short-term, community engagement is inadequate and requirements for accountability of oil companies.2 Some oil companies understand that protecting their public image is of importance in a world that is questioning the
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