Alan Silvey 's ' Jasper Jones '

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Change is inevitable, yet we fight it just the same. Change is going to happen, in fact, it happens every day, maybe it is too small to see, or perhaps we would rather not see it. Nikos Kazantzakis once said, “Since we cannot change reality, let us change the eyes which see reality”. To me this symbolises the different perspectives people can have. This is shown in Craig Silvey’s, “Jasper Jones” novel which explores the concept of change and the understanding of how our search for who we are is clouded by our perceptions and attitudes. The basic human need to establish our own individual path in the world can arise conflict between adolescents and authorities who restrict them; In July 2014 the UN’s, ‘A world at school’ bought together…show more content…
The world breaks and spins and shakes. I’m screaming but they are muffled screams. I can’t breathe in. I feel like I’m underwater. Deaf and drowning”. Silvey’s use of hyperbole allows us to draw attention to what happens when adolescence’ bear the weight of society on their backs, igniting an emotional change. We see Charlie’s attitude towards the Vietnam War and his perception of the world when Charlie is informed of the death of Jeffrey Lu’s family members, “What kind of lousy world is this? Has it always been this way, or has the bottom fallen out of it in the past couple of days? Has it always been so unfair? What is it that tips the scales? I don’t understand it.” This reinforces Charlie’s determination for order which is represented in the use of rhetorical questions. This further demonstrates that our knowledge of the world can affect our attitudes and perspectives.

In conjunction with Charlie, Malala Yousafzai discovers that the world is truly not a wish granting factory, when her home town of Mingora in Pakistan fell under Taliban rule; her brave acts of courage made her a power symbol for women and children everywhere. Change is essential to our evolution. It allowed for Malala to see that the world needed change in order for it to move forward, because the reality is that if we do nothing, it will take until 2086 before all rural African girls can have a secondary education. Malala Yousafzai’s
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