Analysis Of The Sammurai's Garden By Gail Tsukiyama

970 Words4 Pages
Thinking of a samurai, one would not typically think of a solitary, old caretaker, but after reading this book, it may change one's perspective. In the fiction novel, “The Samurai's Garden” by Gail Tsukiyama, readers explore how a samurai slowly becomes recognized. Stephen, a 20-year-old boy is sent far away from his family to explore a completely new world far from the ongoing war. He lives with Matsu, the caretaker of the family property in Tarumi. Suffering from a terrible sickness, Matsu helps Stephen grow and get back a normal life. In a town named Yamaguchi, he develops friendships and grows appreciation to those with leprosy, especially Sachi, a beautiful young woman and one of Matsu’s friends. Stephen starts to love what he can…show more content…
Matsu staggered a bit, then caught his footing, but did nothing. He was much broader and stronger than Kenzo, and could have easily defended himself, but Matsu simply stood,” (page 66). As a samurai, one would know the differences between good and bad and right and wrong. Violence is a bad, wrong, thing to do and Matsu knew exactly not to do so. This proves he prefers peace over assault. Lastly, Stephen pointed out the strong, unforgettable face that Matsu has and how it represents a face of a samurai. Matsu does not only have alike personality traits of a samurai but physical features that others notice in him as well. Not only did Stephen point that out, but Matsu’s response came off somewhat skeptical, “Matsu opened his mouth as if to say something, but quickly swallowed the words before they come to his lips,” (page 30). One could go beyond the text and come to a conclusion as to why he was so quick to stop talking. The author infers that Stephen is correct, that Matsu used to be a samurai but wanted to keep it to himself, leaving readers confused and on the edge of their seats. Matsu grows a very special garden in the novel, which may correlate to the title. Gail talks about it repeatedly and readers can tell Matsu and even other characters deeply appreciate this garden of his. From the beautiful nature, to the deeper meanings behind it, and to the hard work put into it. “Matsu’s garden whispers at you, never shouts;

    More about Analysis Of The Sammurai's Garden By Gail Tsukiyama

      Get Access