Analysis of Socrates in Aristhphane´s Clouds and Plato´s Apology

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Socrates was a pompous man who believed that he was wiser than most, if not all, Athenian men of his time. He is also credited as one of the fathers of western philosophy, his own philosophy revolving around the welfare of one’s soul and reflecting on what the good life was. He was told by an oracle that he was the wisest of men and spent a great deal of time trying to prove it false, he decided that he was considered wise for accepting that he knew nothing, and never claimed to know anything that he questioned. In Plato’s text “Apology” Socrates is depicted as a man who was arrogant, hypercritical of others, and fixed on his ways no matter the consequences. He had the qualities of a man who saw no error in what he was doing because he …show more content…
Socrates was a pompous man who believed that he was wiser than most, if not all, Athenian men of his time. He is also credited as one of the fathers of western philosophy, his own philosophy revolving around the welfare of one’s soul and reflecting on what the good life was. He was told by an oracle that he was the wisest of men and spent a great deal of time trying to prove it false, he decided that he was considered wise for accepting that he knew nothing, and never claimed to know anything that he questioned. In Plato’s text “Apology” Socrates is depicted as a man who was arrogant, hypercritical of others, and fixed on his ways no matter the consequences. He had the qualities of a man who saw no error in what he was doing because he thought he was above average men, and thought he was a benefit to society against what others claimed. In contrast Socrates’ portrayal in Aristophanes’ play “Clouds” is more positive, his character was written wanting men to be educated, hopeful that anyone could learn if they wished to, and helpful in teaching. He has the makings of a very good teacher to the right students, men whose minds were still able to be taught, admitted their lack of knowledge, and had a desire to learn; the sophists benefitted from undermining the superior argument with an inferior one. In the comedy the “Clouds” by Aristophanes, Socrates is first introduced to the audience and Strepsiades suspended above the ground because he claimed that it helped him to make
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