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Big Dipper Research Paper

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When fields of science are being discussed, most people are going to immediately think of fields like biology, chemistry, and physics. It is quite strange that these fields are the most popular. This is because biology, chemistry, and physics can be combined into one single field. That field would be astronomy. While most may think that astronomy is just viewing stars through a telescope, there is an immense amount of more complicated ideas associated with astronomy. What with the fastest speeds, highest masses, major chemical compositions, and even the idea of sustaining life, astronomy has to be one of the most complex fields of science. Without astronomy, many things about the life of humans on earth would be a mystery, not to mention where…show more content…
The lore behind the big dipper is actually about a celestial bear. The story is that the big dipper is that the bowl of the dipper is the actual bear, while the 3 stars that trail behind it are hunters. In autumn and early winter, the asterism is seen in the northern horizon early in the evenings. The Micmac’s described this as being significant to hibernation season and autumn. The reason it is associated with autumn is because the hunters have caught up to the celestial bear and the bear’s bleeding nose is what gives color to the autumn leaves (McClure, 2016). While the big dipper is very well known, it is difficult to discuss its significance without involving its companion, the little dipper.
The little dipper is a different asterism that is a minimized version of the big dipper. The little dipper is also within a different constellation; Ursa Minor. Before 600 BCE, the little dipper was the formation of the constellation Draco the Dragon. However, in the year 600 BCE, the Phoenicians met with the Greek astronomer Thales and showed him how to use the little dipper stars to navigate the sky and the world. This then took the wings off of Draco the Dragon and provided Greek sailors with a better method to navigating the sea (McClure,
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