Blue Cross V. Marshfield

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Blue Cross v. Marshfield Blue Cross/Blue Shield v. Marshfield Michael Stapleton Micker8@aol.com Content Introduction………………………………………………………………….page 2 Jury and Government Findings……………………………………………...page 2 Concepts Relevant to this Case……………………………………………...page 3 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………..page 4 References…………………………………………………………………...page 5 Blue Cross v. Marshfield Introduction The Marshfield clinic is a health care system founded in 1916 comprised largely in Wisconsin (Marshfieldclinic.org, 2012). It has 2 hospitals, 53 community care centers, and has about 800 physicians in more than 80 medical specialties and subspecialties-from cardiology, to neurology, to dentistry - provide care at over 50 locations…show more content…
Concepts Relevant to this Case There are many concepts from our course related to this case. The effectiveness of any law depends on how the courts interpret it and on the vigor of government enforcement (McConnell, et al., 2012). While the jury found that Marshfield clinic and Security had monopoly power, that they engaged in anticompetitive conduct to obtain or maintain that power, and found that Marshfield had illegally entered into agreements with competitors or potential competitors to allocate customers, allocate territories, allocate markets, and to fix fees or prices, the judge subsequently found much of the jury’s decision not reflective of the evidence and over-turned much of the antitrust violations. If this made Marshfield price makers then they could only be characterized as, at the very least, a monopolistic competition all the way up to a monopoly. If a large fraction of the population of Wisconsin could not find “independent” physicians to offer a competitive HMO product, then this clearly would put them as an oligopoly or even monopoly. Conclusion It is very difficult for the government to come in and state that antitrust violations have occurred absolutely in a company.

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