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Caliban In The Tempest

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It is evident from the above passage that Caliban was the sole owner of the island after the death of his mother. There were no restrictions on his movement and he enjoyed the fruits of freedom till the deposed Prospero arrives on the island. At the beginning, Prospero’s attitude to Caliban was like that of an authoritative teacher to a student. He makes all the efforts to reform Caliban by teaching him his language which made him aware of his pathetic condition. After this, Caliban does show his gratitude to Prospero but the problem arises when the teacher wants the unconditional allegiance from the pupil. Besides, Prospero does not accept him as a human. It appears that teaching him the civilized language is to train him to do his bidding in…show more content…
His behavior is in line with natural principles. He is the native of the island and he has every right to live there with freedom. But his confrontation with outside world that is Prospero, has changed all his life. His transformation from noble savage to savage is complete. It is observed that without civilization, humans are essentially good; it is civilization that makes them act in bad ways. His uncouth appearance and abusive language are not only natural but also essential to live in conformity with the surroundings. Shakespeare uses pun in the names of the two main characters of the play—Caliban, if the words are rearranged, reads as canibal and Prospero, as oppressor. Here we are reminded of the comments of Montaigne in his famous essay "Of Cannibals" (1587), in which he stated that although cannibals ceremoniously eat each other, Europeans(civilized people) behave even more barbarously and burn each other
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