Caliban in William Shakespeare´s The Tempest: The Victim Undercover as a Villain

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In the play, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, Caliban is an important character. Caliban is a character who plays as a victim to be pitied, as well as a villain to watch out for. In this essay, I will show clearly how Caliban is a victim and villain by exploring his relationship with Prospero, Miranda, and the island. Caliban has been a victim of mistreatment for many reasons. Him and Miranda definitely do not have a good relationship, in fact Miranda absolutely hates him and she is frightened by him. Although, she has treated him badly psychologically. " 'Tis a villain, sir,/ I do not love to look on". (ac1.2.370-371). She calls him evil and says she doesn't like him. "Abhorred slave/ which any print of goodness wilt not take/ being…show more content…
In the play, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, Caliban is an important character. Caliban is a character who plays as a victim to be pitied, as well as a villain to watch out for. In this essay, I will show clearly how Caliban is a victim and villain by exploring his relationship with Prospero, Miranda, and the island. Caliban has been a victim of mistreatment for many reasons. Him and Miranda definitely do not have a good relationship, in fact Miranda absolutely hates him and she is frightened by him. Although, she has treated him badly psychologically. " 'Tis a villain, sir,/ I do not love to look on". (ac1.2.370-371). She calls him evil and says she doesn't like him. "Abhorred slave/ which any print of goodness wilt not take/ being capable of all ill!" (1.2.422-24). Not only does she call him evil, but he is also treated like a slave. Miranda tells him that he isn't capable of being trained to be good, but he is capable of anything evil. Caliban might have been Miranda's victim, but he was also a villain towards her. He mistreated her by attempting to rape her. "… In mine own cell till thou didst seek to violate/ The honor of my child"(1.2.417-18). Obviously Miranda has not forgiven him, for she is disgusted by this dramatic event. Caliban has a strong love for the island. Unfortunately, Prospero has stolen the island from him. "As I told thee before, I am subject/ to a tyrant, a sorcerer, that by his cunning hath/ cheated me of the island"(3.2. 46-8). Caliban is

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