Essay on Challenging Beliefs in Schlosser's Fast Food Nation

544 Words 3 Pages
In his thought-provoking book, Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser argues that America's fast food franchises have played a major role in contributing to the obesity and ill health of Americans. This paper shows how Schlosser argues that fast food has contributed to uncontrolled development, negatively impacted American culture, and have had a largely negative impact. The effects of Fast Food Nation on American society and politics show that Schlosser's thesis is largely convincing, due to both his careful analysis and his powerful and effective writing style. The paper shows that the book makes the reader challenge many long-held convictions about the fast food industry in America and worldwide.
In 2000, Americans spent more than $110
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Schlosser?s myth-shattering survey takes students to the California subdivisions where the business was born to the industrial corridor along the New Jersey Turnpike where many of fast food?s flavors are concocted. Schlosser suggests that in search of a better, more efficient way to serve customers, fast food has infused its way into the American culture. The evil lies not in the concept of speedy service and a homogenous food experience, it's the byproducts of such an industry that erases the concept of the individual. While he admits that fast food is not the sole source of grief for postmodern America, mentioning the shopping mall and suburban sprawl, Schlosser accurately points out that the actual cost of a Happy Meal is in how it manipulates the average person.
Eric Schlosser?s Fast Food Nation, along with Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me) and many others have undoubtedly contributed to the backlash of the anti-fast food movement. A growing awareness of the connection between diets and disease is slowly but surely taking hold in the minds of consumers. Natural and functional foods are becoming more popular all across the country.
Our government, however, have not taken the steps that many feel are necessary to stop this fast food trend. The closest move toward government regulation kicked off in November 2003, when both the House of Representatives and the Senate proposed legislation making
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