Comradeship in James Hanley's The German Prisoner, Ernest Hemingway's Farewell to Arms, Not So Quiet, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Pat Baker's

1451 Words Jul 13th, 2018 6 Pages
Comradeship in James Hanley's "The German Prisoner", Ernest Hemingway's "Farewell to Arms", "Not So Quiet", "All Quiet on the Western Front", and Pat Baker's "Regeneration"

For many soldiers and volunteers, life on the fronts during the war means danger, and there are few if any distractions from its horrors. Each comradeship serves as a divergence from the daily atrocities and makes life tolerable. Yet, the same bonds that most World War literature romantically portrays can be equally negative. James Hanley’s “The German Prisoner”, shows the horrifying results of such alliances, while “Farewell to Arms” by Ernest Hemmingway reveal that occasionally, some individuals like Lieutenant Henri seek solidarity outside the combat zone.
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He drifts into a reverie and imagines her saying, “Of course I wouldn’t go away. I am always here. I come whenever you want me” (198). This implies that Catherine is his choice as a main wartime support instead of the usual men at the front. Hemmingway confirms that comradeship among colleagues is not always a necessity and is sometimes not possible. There are individuals like Henri, who discover alternative sources and in doing so, dispel the notion of romance that others attach to war and wartime alliances.

Smithy and Paul of “Not So Quiet” and “All Quiet on the Western Front” respectively, both depict comradeship romantically. For them, it is an advantage since it definitely eases the stress of their experiences. Paul Baumer and the other men in his unit all share a strong comradeship and this is seen when they all lie to save Tjaden, a peer, from insubordination charges (Remarque, 90). However, it is Paul and Kat, the unit leader, who have an extremely special relationship. They contrast each other in age and experience. While Baumer is just a young soldier, Kat is forty years old, experienced militarily and has a family at home. The strongest confirmation of their bond occurs as they share the goose which Paul has caught after carefully following Kat’s instructions and which they have roasted. Suddenly, Paul reflects and notices that even though there is not much talking, the two “have

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