Corn And The New World

2496 WordsMar 12, 201510 Pages
The history of corn could be dated back to the beginning of time, but the use and value of corn had been unnoticed until it was introduce by the Native Americans. Where corn had seemed to be a big part of their everyday life from, being in myths, legends, and a huge portion of their diet consisted of corn. " when the Europeans had arrived to the New World during the late fifteenth century, they had learned that the unknown cereal that had been a mystery to them for a long period of time was actually called maize by the indigenous people, this crop was then later on grown and adapted from Canada to southern South America very quickly, which then began to form the new basis of the New World civilization" (textbook). The way corn has been…show more content…
Now it is very much so different than it was before. Now a day 's use of pesticide is utilized during corn cultivation, this will keep the corn protected from any type of harm such as disease or infection carrying insects. Throughout the years, cross-fertilization amid development brought on hereditary changes that changed corn into the shape and size we now know. Today, corn is still more prevalent in this nation than anyplace else on the planet. This is where the word genetically modified food comes into place. Genetically modified food or more commonly known as GMOs, is where small amounts of hereditary material (DNA) from different organisms have been added to the original crop or plant which is to be modified through the new addition. The overall topic of GMOs is very hot, there are many individuals who believe in them and there are those who do not support the idea and believe that ramifications are a great risk for the future and should be put a stop to immediately. As of now, the GMOs that are available today have been given hereditary qualities to aim to preserve from bugs, resilience to pesticides, or enhance the crops quality. Practically every food item that can be found in our local grocery store, such as apples, corn and tomatoes are all
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