Essay on Disillusionment in Hemingway´s The Sun Also Rises

1433 Words6 Pages
Disillusionment does not merely occur in only novels; every single individual to walk the Earth will experience mental displeasure at some point within their lives. Nevertheless, many choose to let unfortunate events circle within their souls and become encrypted into their memory. Once this happens, the role of aimlessness takes its course, adverse fate reigns, and the feeling of disenchantment dwells in the mind. Hemingway’s novel, The Sun Also Rises, grasps this very subject in a subliminal way; one must accurately analyze Hemingway’s somber tone and sparse writing style in order to find the hidden symbolism and themes captured within this literary work. His protagonist, Jake Barnes, has certainly experienced prodigious pain, but…show more content…
In Hemingway's philosophical paradigm, it is subconsciously encoded that Jake suffers with poise and refinement. He does not become irate with Brett for her decision, by contrast, he accepts her promiscuity and even chooses to help her in a multitude of ways, even though she repeatedly claims that she loves him. Consequentially, this is not to say that Jake did not suffer, rather than to suggest that he keeps his pain suppressed so as not to enervate himself any further. Jake knows the two can never initiate a relationship yet he still wishes to do so; his undying desire to be with Brett serves as his illusion even though it is a complete contradiction of his reality, as presented in the novel. This is the disheartening romantic imagery that deceits his realistic views. For example, in Chapter 7, Hemingway’s use of minimum dialogue between Brett and Jake has much meaning, which is rarely expressed throughout the novel. “Couldn’t we live together, Brett? …” “I don’t think so. I’d just tromper you with everybody.” (p. 62) Essentially, what Brett is saying is that due to his – handicap, if you will, all she would do is hurt Jake and commit constant infidelity against him, therefore, any chance for commitment is but a joke. This direct dialogue sets the underlying conflict as a form for one of the main themes expressed by Hemingway throughout this novel. How complimentary it is that Jake, of military background, continues to strive for bravery and
Open Document