Economic Impacts Of The Panama Canal

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#4 (Panama Canal) The Panama Canal is a 48 mile long canal that cuts through the isthmus of Panama. It connects both the atlantic, and Pacific Oceans making transportation faster, so goods, services, and people wouldn’t have to go over North America, or under South America. The canal is man-made and was made by the United States. The canal was successfully built in 1914 by the United States after 10 years of building it. However, the French tried to build it before the U.S.A. It started in 1881 and ended in failure in 1894 because of the death of 22,000 workers because of mosquitoes carrying illness, constant rain, and mud slopes. These things made the project bankrupt, so they eventually sold it to the United States for 40…show more content…
It is a very good source of jobs for people in Latin America. This boosts economic activity in the area, making the area better. Since a lot of ships come in on a daily basis, money comes in fast. Panama has also brought in countless numbers of tourist to come see the Canal, making the economy grow and grow. Before the canal the boats would have to go under South America where there were strong winds and cold waters, taking a long time. After the canal was built, it cut 8,000 miles from travel time to go around South America, and made the cost less for ships wanting to get to the Pacific or Atlantic Ocean. Now, countries are able to trade with other countries far away because of the canal. The overall importance of the Canal is very high. Without it, Panama wouldn’t have the booming city like it does today, would have a low amount of jobs, and other countries wouldn’t be able to trade easily by boat. The canal has made shipment of goods by boats much easier, since they don’t have to cut under South America. If it was never created, boat travel would not be like it is today.

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