Evelina

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Stephanie Peacock Ms. Kane Literature 11: Junior Thesis 29 January 2008 Junior Thesis Prior the 19th Century, men dominated the literary writings of the day, while women published few influential works. However, in the 19th Century, women began to publish their works more freely, even if anonymously, and included some real masterpieces, such as Francis Burney’s Evelina and Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. While some at the time may have considered such books to be just another frivolous read, in reality, these works actually proved to be an enlightening window of the era. They portray the life,…show more content…
To find a man agreeable who one is determined to hate! Do not wish me such an evil” (Austen 91). She is crystal clear and gives no ambiguous statements. She offer not only her opinions, she also offers advice, even interrupting Elizabeth. Being able to confide in someone besides family is a rare commodity and shows the complete trust in their friendship. Family is a major factor in Pride and Prejudice. For example, Mr. Gardiner, Mr. Bennet’s brother, respects Mr. Bennet and his family. A source of concern, not just duty, causes Gardner to go out of his way to search for Lydia Bennet when she runs away with Mr. Wickham. Mr. Gardiner, “Rendered by spiritless by the ill success of all their endeavors, [he has] yielded to his brother-in-law’s entreaty that [he] would return to his family, and leave him to whatever occasion might suggest advisable for continuing their pursuit” (Austen 288). Normally, once “(the) unfortunate affair” has been found, and no solution rendered, Mr. Gardiner’s duty would then release him from having to help the Bennets from any further point. (Austen 279). Yet, by continuing the search he proves his dedication to Elizabeth and the rest of the family. A point brought by Mr. Cottom is that all these family interactions are considered ‘impersonal.’ In more detail he thinks, “As Austen describes them, the relations of the individuals within the family are as formal as or more than their relations
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