Examples Of Hypocrisy In The Adventures Of Huck Finn

1542 WordsJul 26, 20177 Pages
How has man’s inhumanity towards man shaped society? Man’s inhumanity towards man has played a profound role in humans throughout history. Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huck Finn is an example of him using satire to reach his readers denouncing slavery and religious hypocrisy giving examples of man’s inhumanity towards man. His main objective in using satire in Huck Finn was to protest the evil practices that were so frequent in the Frontier. By using satire this made it more appealing and enjoyable for readers and hopefully more effective in his attempt to change society. Twain depicted it under different forms like slavery and violence, certain targets of his satire were swindling, materialism, and drunkenness. Some of these were…show more content…
But it warn 't so. I tried it" (Twain 8). His view of religion continues to deteriorate through Christian’s view of slavery. Slavery was the way of life for many Southerners and almost all African Americans. Those who did not partake in this destructive lifestyle were still affected by the choices people made regarding slavery. Slaves were treated as property by virtually all whites living in the South, and some Northerners looked down on them. Huck witnesses slavery firsthand since Miss Watson owns slaves. Twain uses Huck to make decisions based on this hypocritical slave-owning, Christian lifestyle. Huck must choose to either aid a runaway slave named Jim or return him to Miss Watson, while the white society of the South would expect Huck to return Jim to Miss Watson. Huck and Jim 's friendship makes this a significant decision because Huck is morally conflicted. Jim is his friend, but he is also the property of Miss Watson. An excerpt from Magill 's Survey of American Literature puts the situation in a right perspective exclaiming “Jim is property before he is man, and Huck is deeply troubled, surprisingly, by the thought that he is going to help Jim, not only because he sees it, in part, as a robbery, but more interestingly, because he sees his cooperation as a betrayal of his obligation to the
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