F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby Essay

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F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby “So The Great Gatsby house at West Egg glittered with all the lights of the twenties, there were was always Gatsby’s supplicating hand, reaching out to make glamour with what he had lost be cruel chance...of how little Gatsby wanted at bottom-not to understand society, but to ape it”(21-22). The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald features constant parties, glamorous houses, and extravagance to reveal the values of the characters and the society they live in. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby exemplifies the innate values and morals of its characters…show more content…
Daisy’s reaction to West Egg characterizes the values of West Egg society, in its endless garishness and extravagance apparently garish and overly extravagant. She sees West Egg as if with new eyes, worlds apart from the sophisticated tastes of East egg. On the other hand, East Egg society values, however, similarly convey a sense of purposelessness. At Daisy’s mansion, “they [clarify the ‘they,’ its ambiguous] knew that presently dinner would be over and a little later the evening too would be over and casually put away. It was sharply different form the West, where evening was hurried form phase to phase” (27). At Daisy’s mansion, the guests don’t do anything. The conversation is insignificant meaningless and superficial, something that could be ‘casually put away’ as just another night. This reveals the purposelessness of the lives of the rich, who as they don’t have goals, ambitions, and or aspirations. Instead, they soak in the comfort of their money. “While we admired he brought more and the soft rich heap mounted higher…Daisy bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily. ‘They’re such beautiful shirts,’ she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. ‘It makes
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