preview

Families Breaking Apart in Alan Paton's Cry: The Beloved Country

Decent Essays
In Cry, the Beloved Country, Alan Paton shows us how two families are breaking apart. The natives are suffering but they are not the only one who are suffering. A white person’s family is also falling apart. Stephen Kumalo is a native from Ndotsheni and he has trouble with his family from the start. John Jarvis is a white person and he is also experiencing trouble with his family.
Stephen Kumalo’s family is in a bad condition. His sister, Gertrude, and his son, Absalom, left Ndotsheni a long time ago. They went to Johannesburg and they never came back. Kumalo decides to go to Johannesburg to find his sister and his son when he receives a letter from Msimangu. He goes to Johannesburg despite the difficulties he will face just so he could restore the family. Kumalo encounters trouble as soon as he arrives at Johannesburg. He meets Gertrude and he finds out that she’s a prostitute and a liquor seller. “You have shamed us, he says in a low voice, not wishing to make it known to the world. A liquor seller, a prostitute, with a child and you don’t know where it is? Your brother a priest. How could you do this to us?” (61). Kumalo is ashamed at Gertrude because he is a priest and Gertrude left home and has become a prostitute. He feels disappointed that she has a child and she doesn’t know where the child is at. -EXPLAIN MORE-. Kumalo tells Gertrude to go back home with him and she agrees. She tells him that she wants to return and have a better life. Kumalo’s family was starting
    Get Access