Frankenstein And The Picture Of Dorian Gray As British Gothic Literature

1837 Words8 Pages
Eric Haney Mr. Kearney English 4 AP 27 May 2015 Frankenstein and The Picture of Dorian Gray as British Gothic Literature “There is something at work in my soul, which I do not understand.” This quote from Mary Shelley 's classic gothic novel Frankenstein is very representative of the functional importance of gothic literature to humanity. Gothic literature can be viewed as the dark side of the human soul, as good usually triumphs over evil in storytelling; gothic literature is the release of all the darkness of the human experience usually embodied in a character. When used to describe literature, the word gothic is defined as 'of or relating to a style of fiction characterized by the use of desolate or remote settings and macabre, mysterious, or violent incidents ' (Webster). In addition to these stylings, there are several elements such as the supernatural, heroes, villains, and emotions that are very common of the gothic genre (Marinaro). Frankenstein is often viewed as the archetype of gothic literature, for the novel is certainly the most well known and studied literary work of the gothic genre, and also possibly because of its usage of classic gothic themes. Oscar Wilde 's The Picture of Dorian Gray, however described as gothic literature, departs from many of the listed classic themes. The following will examine the origins of the gothic novel, it 's characteristics, and how the British novels Frankenstein and The Picture of Dorian Gray exemplify, by usage

More about Frankenstein And The Picture Of Dorian Gray As British Gothic Literature

Open Document