From a Native Daughter

1952 WordsFeb 16, 20168 Pages
Neel Patel Professor Naomi Taub Rhetoric 105 F6 14 September 2015 Hawaiian Empowerment: A Native’s Point of View In “From a Native Daughter,” writer, activist, and Native Hawaiian academic, Haunani-Kay Trask recounts her personal feelings along with her people’s feelings with how the ‘haole’ (white) people overwhelmed and distorted the historical context of the native Hawaiian inhabitants. Trask’s purpose is to convey the message that the native Hawaiians’ ancient culture is described as oppressive and tyrannical by white historians, rather that it was a society that functioned efficiently before the Europeans seized the land. She adopts an affectionate yet blunt tone throughout the course of the selection in order to contend…show more content…
They provide certain time periods which help the Hawaiians know their history. This appeal to logos helps convey her message that the truth behind the pagan Hawaiians is concealed by the white historian point of view. As the chapter continues, she has been highly influenced throughout her life that historians have been accurate on who the Hawaiians used to be. “This was the West’s view of itself through the degradation of her own past” (Trask 117). The argument she makes here channels her turning point in the article to bluntly declare that she has been seeing her history from the wrong perspective. Her very little use of logos throughout her selection enabled her audience to start trusting her main argument and persuaded readers to see her point of view. This is due to the high regard of oral traditions and ways of knowing that the Hawaiians were pronoun for. The author moves to her actual realization that she has been misunderstood her entire lifetime along with the Western world by extending her vocabulary and appealing to emotional diction. These are seen clearly through “’aina” meaning culture and “the great bloodiness of memory: genealogy” (Trask 118). These few examples show how her language is connecting with the audience on an emotional level by using native terms and powerful language such as “bloodiness.” She appeals to the ideals of pathos by employing meaningful words when describing the traits of her people. She
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