Hoarding Disorder

1155 Words5 Pages
Hoarding Disorder Up to 5% of the world’s population displays some sign of clinic hoarding. Hoarding involves the compulsive acquisition and accumulation of objects, animals, and trash and other debris. The hoarder, who often has another mental illness such as depression, is unable or unwilling to discard items, frequently resulting in health and safety hazards to those who reside in or visit the dwelling (Hurd, 2015). Hoarding can affect many aspects of one’s life causing severe problems and can begin as early as adolescent years continuing through elderly life. Compulsive Hoarding also known as hoarding disorder, syllogomania, and disposophobia dates all the way back to a Smith College psychology laboratory. One reference of hoarding…show more content…
Because there was none, she became the first person to conduct a study on hoarding disorder. The study provided the first hoarding picture and also established that hoarding can run in families. A few years after this research began; two Smith students published the first theoretical account of hoarding that outlines the three dimensions of hoarding: clutter, excessive acquisitions, and difficulty discarding. Continued research about hoarding includes genetics, phenomenology, epidemiology, neuroimaging, and also how hoarding is shown in children and elders. Several Smith College students since 1993 have co- authored scientific papers on hoarding. In 2013, in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM for short, hoarding became an official mental disorder. It was considered a mental health disorder before but only a subtype of OCD. Now, because of the abundance of research that has been done and the studies that show people who display hoarding disorder had no other symptoms of OCD; hoarding has accumulated its own section in DSM. For a diagnosis of hoarding disorder, the behavior must either cause distress to the individual or impairment in the person's…show more content…
In a community based study, known as the Hopkins Epidemiology of Personality Disorder Study, 735 participants were studied to estimate the prevalence and evaluated correlates of hoarding. The aims of the study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence of hoarding, overall and by sociodemographic characteristics, in this community sample; 2) to investigate the association between hoarding behavior and potential clinical correlates (personality disorder and personality dimensions; history of psychiatric disorders; and current functioning); 3) to investigate the association between hoarding behavior and specific self-reported childhood adversities, including parental psychopathology and specific childhood traumas; and 4) to determine if the relationships between hoarding and specific correlates are different in men and women (Samuels et al., 2008). 27 of the 735 participants portrayed signs of having pathological hoarding. The prevalence of hoarding was greater in older than younger age groups, greater in men than women, and inversely related to household income. The community citizens that displayed the signs of hoarding faced daily difficulties. The prevalence of hoarding seemed to increase as age increased. The percentage rose from 2.3 percent to 6.2 percent with hoarding becoming three times greater in the oldest compared to the youngest. Men
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