How do generic conventions inform your understanding of Macbeth?

1463 Words Oct 4th, 2013 6 Pages
Macbeth

How do generic conventions inform your understanding of Macbeth?

The tragedy of Macbeth is his “Vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself and fallson th’other.”
In this famous play, William Shakespeare positions the audience to feel pity towards the protagonist involved, and potentially the protagonist is the tragic hero. But in the play,
Macbeth, how does he do this? Shakespeare positions us to feel pity for Macbeth, the protagonist, by using generic, dramatic and theatrical conventions such as soliloquies, hamartia and symbolism. My understanding of the play Macbeth, is shaped by
Shakespeare’s use of generic conventions to represent the characters inner turmoil and through this, their tragic flaws. Specifically,
…show more content…
Although at the same time, it touches on the theme of masculinity, “tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,” Act 1 Scene 5, line 31. “Come to my woman’s breasts, And take my milk for gall,” Act 1 Scene 5, line 38. Both quotes suggest the different sex, “unsex me here”, by changing sex Lady Macbeth feels she would be more masculine, than she is now, as a man. With the second quote mentioning “milk”, this suggests womanhood, represented by milk and breasts, symbolising nurture and compassion and she says she has this as well as her ruthlessness but wants to be more cruel, “of direct cruelty! Make thick my blood” Act 1
Scene 5, line 33. When all of her plans and inner turmoil is revealed to us, her hamartia suddenly becomes clearer – her flaw is that she is extremely power hungry and will do anything to feed it, however this results in her downfall as she turns insane from her guilty conscience of manipulating Macbeth, simply because she is too cowardice to do her own business. Macbeth’s first soliloquy in the play portrays him to be his sane self, making the agonizing decision of whether he should go through with the evil deed of assassinating King Duncan.
In his decision he puts into account King Duncan’s
Open Document