How does Williams present conflict between old and new in Scene Two of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’?

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How does Williams present conflict between old and new in Scene Two of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’? Williams presents the conflict between old and new in Scene Two in different ways, such as the manner in which Williams portrays the three characters Blanche, Stanley and Stella, as well the added tension through the structure of the scene, and finally in the stage directions. Through the use of these techniques, an atmosphere of tension is seen and felt by the audience, and the contrasts of the characters motifs are clearly highlighted. The conflict between old and new is demonstrated clearly by a statement made by Stanley, which really shows the audience how contrasted the two families in the play are, ‘The Kowalskis and the Du Bois…show more content…
These similarities help the audience to relate to the characters and feel sympathy for Williams as they symbolise his parents. Williams presents conflict between old and new in Scene Two by the way in which the scene is structured. Scene Two has a tripartite structure with tension increasing progressively throughout the scene up until Blanche discovers Stella’s pregnancy. The first part of the scene comprises of Stanley and Stella talking about Blanche and Belle Reve. Stella is portrayed to the audience, at the beginning of the scene, as some sort of ‘peacekeeper’. She is trying to keep Stanley and Blanche happy, and this makes the audience feel sympathy for her as it seems like Stella is the one doing all the hard work. Also, tension and unease is built up during Stella’s polysyndetic listing, when Williams introduces dramatic irony. Stella tells Stanley, ‘don’t mention the baby’ to Blanche, giving the audience a sense of deceit and builds up the tension as some characters of the play have no idea about the baby. Also in the first part of Scene Two, Stanley has a great disregard for Blanche’s privacy as he rummages through all her belongings, and this makes the audience feel awkward as Stanley has no respect for Blanche, or her belongings, whatsoever. In the second part of the tripartite structure in Scene Two, Blanche and Stanley flirt and argue with each other. This section emphasises the contrast between old and new as Stanley’s main reason for talking to
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