How the Earl Warren Court Liberalized America Essay

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The Warren Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States between 1953 and 1969, when Earl Warren served as Chief Justice. Warren led a liberal majority that used judicial power in dramatic fashion, to the consternation of conservative opponents. The Warren Court expanded civil rights, civil liberties, judicial power, and the federal power in dramatic ways. One way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the court cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964), and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), where these court cases helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. Another way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the cases of Tinker v. Des Moines ISD (1969), Engle v. Vitale (1962), and …show more content…
The Warren Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States between 1953 and 1969, when Earl Warren served as Chief Justice. Warren led a liberal majority that used judicial power in dramatic fashion, to the consternation of conservative opponents. The Warren Court expanded civil rights, civil liberties, judicial power, and the federal power in dramatic ways. One way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the court cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964), and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), where these court cases helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. Another way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the cases of Tinker v. Des Moines ISD (1969), Engle v. Vitale (1962), and New York Times v. Sullivan (1964), where the Supreme Court sought to expand the scope of application of the First Amendment, however also limiting those freedoms as well. Lastly, the third way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the issues of the right to privacy, Griswold v. Connecticut (1965), the incorporation of the exclusionary rule, Mapp v. Ohio (1961), and lastly the banning of segregation in public schools, Brown v. Board of Education (1954). The cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964) and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), all helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. In the court case of Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court ruled that if the defendant can not afford an attorney, then
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