Literary Devices In 'Gaston' By William Saroyan

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William Saroyan uses many literary devices such as symbolism and characterization throughout his short story, “Gaston”. He uses them to convey that parents have an influence on their children, who look up to them. He includes many details in each instance of the literary devices, to expand on the theme he is trying to convey. The first instance that symbolism occurs is when the author uses Gaston, a bug that is found in a peach, who describes the father. “What’s he saying?” asks the daughter. The father replies “Well he’s a little confused. Now inside that house of his he had everything in order.” This excerpt from the story illustrates that Gaston is used to symbolize the father, and that he had his life all together, and now it has fallen…show more content…
The first case that characterization occurs is when the author shows the differences between the parents. For instance, the author explains “Her mother was sending a chauffeur to pick her up. Then tomorrow they would fly back to New York.” These narration quotes illustrate that the mom is very wealthy, since she is sending a chauffeur to pick her daughter up. The second part of the quote, suggests that the mother is proper, for being a city girl, as stated that they would fly back to New York. Another instance where the author uses characterization is when the mother states “Somebody gets a peach with a bug in it, and throws it away, he makes up a lot of foolishness.” Then the daughter snaps back with saying “It’s not foolishness.” These quotes show that the father impacts the daughter to see the good in everything, where previously the daughter states “Well, we’re not going to squash him, that’s one thing we’re not going to do.” This response refers to how the daughter does not see the bug as a horrible thing, but yet as a fascinating thing. The last instance of characterization occurs when the mother explains “But it is just a bug isn’t it really? That’s all it is.” The daughter replies with “And we have to squash it?” The mother answers with “That’s right.” This conversation illustrates that the mother influenced the daughter to grow up. She convinced the daughter that a bug is just a bug, and

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