Many Readers Interpret The Theme Of The Novel Jane Eyre

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Many readers interpret the theme of the novel Jane Eyre as finding one 's self, with the support of the interpretation that Jane 's main pursuit in life is individualism. However, if it 's taken away from the feminist focus, and the focus is put on how Jane 's character develops with the changes in her surroundings and places she goes in her life; Jane hasn 't been developing and finding herself in this individualism but in her faith in God. Charlotte Bronte intertwined many themes in this novel and many focus on the idea of how she made Jane break away from the Victorian Era social norms. The feminism is what truly stuck out of this book during this era because these ideals of women individualism were quite new and faith was a normal…show more content…
As the novel changes scenes to Lowood, Jane 's personality and values change with it. At Lowood she originally still had “unchristian” values when she arrived, which shows through in her conversations with her new found friend Helen “... I must dislike those who, whatever I do to please them, persist in disliking me; I must resist those who punish me unjustly. It is natural as that I should love those who show me affection, or submit to punishment when I feel deserved”(48). While Helen represented a girl of the social norms of this era stating the complete opposite about the outlook on life during their conversation. Charlotte Bronte uses Jane 's friendship with Helen to show us how far away Jane is from accepting these values by having a character like Helen that is strong in those values. After Bronte shows us this wide gap, she gives us a turning point in Jane 's views, with the conversation between Helen and Jane once again, but this time at Helen 's death bed, “‘I believe: I have faith: I am going to God,’ ‘Where is God? What is God?’”(69). She questions the possibilities of this belief when Helen shows her it 's not forced, but chosen aspect of someone 's life. This is the point where Bronte shows Jane has changed in this aspect in her life and is developing with her faith, unlike her individualism which is the same as it was at Gateshead.

When the novel 's scene shifts once again to Thornfield, Jane comes with
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