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Marriage Traditions in Persuasion by Jane Austen Essay

Decent Essays
England has always had a rich history of interesting cultural traditions but arguably none as prevalent as marriage. Marriage, the union of two people with emotional ideals and expectations, are brought on by many different factors that include: for love, for money, for climbing social status, escapism, survival, etc. In Jane Austen’s novels, she focuses on the importance of marriage in her world because she wanted to emphasize how marriage is the most important life event of a woman as this would determine her place in society. Persuasion shows readers good and bad examples of marriage: the amiable Crofts and other couples such as Sir Walter & Lady Elliot and the Smiths. Jane Austen uses the Crofts to support the importance of marriage…show more content…
The Navy plays a large role in their relationship as well. Even when the Admiral has to go to sea, his wife always travels with him. Mrs. Croft shares many similarities with other Navy men such as loyalty, constant companionship with her husband, and upholding the respect and equality that greatly influences her marriage. Jane Austen, who writes Anne to be a character that readers like and trust, portrays Anne envying the happy marriage between the Crofts as an ideal she wishes she and Wentworth could have had. Jane Austen outlines her perfect marriage through the Crofts’ value balanced power and regard for each other. Jane Austen admires the Crofts as a model couple for quality marriages in her society. The couple represents an equal union between two people in love that Austen argues is too rare in the Regency era. Anne and Austen feel similarly on many points as the story is told through Anne’s eyes. On a visit to see the Crofts in her old house, Admiral Croft tells Anne “Now this must be very bad for you to be coming and finding us here." (118). Admiral Croft is the only person who sympathizes with Anne losing her home and being forced to see strangers live there. His compassion and sympathy reflect the happy state of his life and subsequently, his marriage. He later tells Anne that he has taken steps to make Kellynch Hall more practical and mentioning his wife has helped him move some furniture. The equality of the work load in
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