Mary Shelly's 'Frankenstein' and the Consideration of Psychological Traumas Women Face in the Lack of Control Over Their Reproductive Organs

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Mary Shelly's Frankenstein and the Consideration of Psychological Traumas Women Face in the Lack of Control Over Their Reproductive Organs I. Objective The objective of this study is to examine Mary Shelly's work 'Frankenstein' and to consider the psychological traumas women face in the lack of control over their reproductive organs. II. Introduction Women throughout the world have experienced psychological trauma over the lack of control over their reproductive organs and whether this trauma has been associated with giving birth when they did not desire to do so or being disallowed to conceive when they desired to conceive, this trauma is very real and evidence in Mary Shelly's 'Frankenstein'. III. Methodology The methodology of this study is qualitative in nature. Qualitative research is interpretive and descriptive and is appropriate in seeking to understand social phenomenon such as that examined in this present study. IV. Literature Review Bewell (1988) writes that the first to argue that the work of Mary Shelley "should be read as a birth myth" was Ellen Moers since the novel appears to express the painful experience that Shelley had as a young pregnant woman who was pregnant almost continuously for five years but whose babies all died soon after birth. Shelley was also not married and when she turned eighteen 'Mary Godwin' began the novel entitled "Frankenstein". (p.1) Bewell writes that Shelley's experience of pregnancy and loss "was not simply a

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