Overview of the Effectiveness of the International Criminal Court

3109 Words Apr 17th, 2013 13 Pages
International Criminal Court: Effective?
Falyn A. Hahn
Lynchburg College

International Criminal Court: Effective? As our society becomes more and more globalized, international relations have become a necessity. However, cooperation on an international level, between different cultures and countries, can be difficult. As a result, nowadays we have such organizations as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations (UN), and other that unite many countries by common goals such as preventing conflicts and solving existing disputes. Naturally, to fulfill this task there is a need for regulations and laws on an international level that all states are required to abide by. These regulations serve as a sort of “international
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The case also highlighted the gravity of recruitment, enlistment, and conscription of child soldiers (Bracknell, 2012). The Prosecutor of the ICC charged Thomas Lubanga Dyilo with the war crime of enlisting children under the age of fifteen; conscripting children under the age of fifteen; and using children under the age of fifteen to participate actively in hostilities. The prosecutor requested a 30 year sentence, or 20 years should Lubanga submit a genuine apology and commit to working to prevent future crimes and promote peace (ICC, 2012). It is interesting to note the offer of a reduced sentence with an apology statement. Lubanga was convicted in March 2012 of the war crimes and was sentenced to fourteen years in jail. This was the first verdict of the ICC since it was set up over ten years ago, and a huge landmark case.
The other case that has actually made it to trial was more recent. In December of 2012 a former senior commander of the Bosnian Serb Army, Zdravko Tolimir, was convicted of genocide and sentenced to life in prison for his role in the killings of thousands of prisoners in Bosnia. He deliberately participated in the destruction of Muslim communities under the United Nations protections (Simons, 2012). This case also set a legal precedent of “not taking it easy” on a defendant because of their age. Zdravko Tolimir is sixty-four years old (Institute, 2012). The trial, which lasted for 242 days, was interrupted several times
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