Presidential Election Of 2016 Brought A Terrible Name To

2008 WordsFeb 15, 20179 Pages
presidential election of 2016 brought a terrible name to the Hispanic population. With the constant negativity revolving these families who have made their homes in the United States, the new policy of deportation has come up more than once throughout the election. However, this historical unrepresented group has made an impact, and without them, we would not have the same society, culture, or diversity. Examining their migration to the United States, their culture, their growth, and how the United States is viewing them today, we will be able to see their impact on the U.S. Migration Immigration has been vital to the growth of the United States. We are a melting pot of different ethnicities, and it is no different for the…show more content…
This fear increased as The Great Depression approached (Hoffnung-Garskof, 2007). In the 1930’s, Michigan officials felt that it was their duty to solve the issue at hand. “Ethnic cleansing” was their solution, and as a result, unemployed Mexicans were deported. After the depression, America found a way to kick start the economy again. The sugar beet industry was once again flourishing. Minimum wage was established, and manufacturers smuggled in Mexican workers to help. In 1957, the migrant worker population increased to 106,000 people in Michigan (Hoffnung-Garskof, 2007). The Mexican people migrated to the U.S. in search of better lives. They were an active part in the building of the United States economy and our culture. Culture The Mexican community is a diverse one, and one that has a distinct culture. To begin, there are subgroups within the Mexican community, but the biggest subgroup is mestizo which is 60% of the population (Zimmerman, 2015). Also, there are many languages inside their communities. The main one is Spanish at 92.7%, but there are also indigenous languages such as Mayan or Nahuatl. There are some common words that come from the indigenous languages such as tomato, coyote, and chocolate (Zimmerman, 2015). Another huge part of their culture, is their religion. 82% of the Mexican people identify with Catholic. Other religions include Jehovah’s Witnesses, Methodists, Baptists, and Anglicans. There is diversity in their culture just like everyone

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