Puerto Rican Culture Development within the New York Diaspora

649 Words3 Pages
According to census research at Lehman College (1), during 1945 to the 1950’s more than half a million Puerto Rican natives migrated to several parts of the USA, originally from their own homeland, Puerto Rico. Several of the locations that Puerto Ricans migrated to include Chicago, New Jersey, Boston, Philadelphia, and New York City. One of the cities that experienced a large boom of Puerto Rican population was New York. This period was known as the “Great Migration” and had several factors that led to the mass migration. Some of these major events include the 1917 signing of the Jones-Shafroth Act by Woodrow Wilson, and the Great Depression. Afterwards, Puerto Ricans were permanent citizens of the US From these events. This still poses…show more content…
They start migrating due to hoping on finding a new start in the states because Puerto Rico’s economy at its worse at this time, and the common person is not finding jobs & is starving. As air travel technology advanced and low cost air flights appeared, this is where we start to see when a huge amount of Puerto Ricans decide to migrate over into the United States, and one of the states they migrate largely to in particular was New York City. They also migrate there also because non – stop flights toward New York were also becoming available at the time. Those Puerto Ricans also sought out a new beginning to their lives. This is also the time when Puerto Ricans start developing their culture and neighborhoods in New York.
In 1945, technological advances in the aviation field helped Puerto Ricans migrate in immense numbers, and also the air fare of flights were affordable for the average Puerto Rican instead of a higher upper class only being able to afford air travel. Puerto Ricans then began to travel all over the US, but a massive number, about 200 to 500 thousand migrated toward New York. Now before the mass migration, Puerto Ricans were already living in New York, specifically in East Harlem known as “El Barrio” to many Puerto Ricans. They had moved there mainly because of the affordable housing rent and non-existent racial discrimination since racial discrimination was still big in the 1920-60’s. The
Open Document