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Rebekah Nathan’s Study on the Behavior of Modern College Students

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Nowadays, it seems, the college life consists mainly of beer, parties, and sex and less about the idea of gaining an education to better oneself academically. Professors often wonder what students are thinking when it comes to their class and why they act the way they do towards things such as taking notes and study for exams. A female anthropologist professor at an unknown university (AnyU) realized that she could no long understand the habits of the students she was teaching. She believed that the best way to figure out these misunderstandings would be for her to get to know students in an informal and personal way, one that she could not do as a professor. After weighing all the possibilities and ethical situations, she decided to…show more content…
It is important to understand that college is almost entirely made up of students or are just recently out of the shadows of having to be told what to do by their parents. Low turnouts to event could have happened largely because students wanted to do things on their own. Nathan references a time when her RA sent out a survey to determine what the residents would be interested in participating in. The responses determined that a movie night was of great interest but when the event took place only two people showed up. It showed that students were willing to give feedback on things but would rather just let things happen instead of having an event set up.(Nathan 2005, 46).
The biggest idea that Nathan covered was the idea of American individualism. This idea is very visible by the way; that her fellow classmates show how important privacy is to them. She addresses this first by talking about the lack of participation in fraternities and sororities, where fewer than 10% of students participate.(Nathan, 2005). Ideally, fraternities and sororities are big for developing students socially. It allows students to indulge in community service while letting them meet new people
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