Resilience: Health and Literature Review Page

10409 Words Mar 16th, 2012 42 Pages
Resilience Theory: A Literature Review with special chapters on deployment resilience in military families & resilience theory in social work

by Adrian DuPlessis VanBreda October 2001

RESILIENCE THEORY: A LITERATURE REVIEW

Author: Title: Date: Report No: Institution:

Adrian DuPlessis VanBreda Resilience Theory: A Literature Review October 2001 MPI/R/104/12/1/4, dd October 2001 South African Military Health Service, Military Psychological Institute, Social Work Research & Development

City: E-mail: Address:

Pretoria, South Africa Adrian@vanbreda.org Major A.D. Van Breda Military Psychological Institute Private Bag X02 Gezina 0031 South Africa

Resilience Theory: A Literature Review

Page i

CHAPTER TWO: INDIVIDUAL RESILIENCE

2.1
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“Being able to selectively disengage from the home and engage with those outside, and then to reengage. “Being internally oriented and having an internal locus of control. “The absence of serious illness during adolescence.” The capacity of an individual to cope during difficulty is central to their resilience. Pearlin and Schooler (1982, p. 109) define coping as “the thing that people do to avoid being harmed by lifestrain.” These authors conducted 2300 interviews in the urbanized Chicago area and through content analysis of these interviews identified three main types of coping that serve distinct functions, viz: “Responses that change the situation out of which strainful experience arises” (Pearlin & Schooler, 1982, p. 115). Interestingly, their research found that this type of coping was not widely used. Several reasons are offered to explain this. Page 6 Resilience Theory: A Literature Review

People must first recognize the situation which is causing the stress; something which is not always possible. directly. efforts. It is interesting to note that much of resilience theory and research has revolved around situations which are impervious to change efforts, such as being in a concentration camp, having a terminal illness, being in a war, growing up in poverty, etc. In such circumstances, little can be done to directly change the situation causing the stress. Rather, other forms of coping are required. “Responses that