Richard II By Richard IIi

2070 WordsDec 3, 20159 Pages
Richard II’s subjects become increasingly aware of his corrupt ruling, yet they do nothing to overthrow Richard II because they strongly believe in his divine right to rule. John of Gaunt, Richard II’s uncle, along with the rest of his subjects, allow Richard II to get away with murder and other questionable acts because he is their king anointed by God. Gaunt reveals he knows that Richard II played a part in killing John’s brother to remain king: God’s is the quarrel; for God’s substitute, His deputy anointed in His sight, Hath caused his death: the which if wrongfully, Let heaven revenge: for I may never lift An angry arm against His minister (Richard II II.ii.37-41) The Duchess of Glouster advices Gaunt to seek revenge upon Richard II, but Gaunt refuses to take action and says that the need to leave the punishment up to God: “put we our quarrel to the will of heaven” (Richard II I.ii.6). Gaunt is not fearful of what King Richard II could do to him, but of what God might do to him because he believes Richard II to have been given his position by the grace of God, therefore Gaunt must stand back and let God eventually handle Richard II’s punishment. At the beginning of the play, John of Gaunt was an advocate for anything that Richard II did; however, towards the end of the play a transition has occurred and Gaunt starts to view Richard II in a different manner. Bolingbroke has returned and laid his stake on the English crown, causing Gaunt and some of the other
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