Symptoms And Symptoms Of Feline Osteoarthritis Is Becoming Much More Common

743 Words Sep 8th, 2015 3 Pages
The thought of our beloved pet in pain is a guardian 's worst fear. If only they could tell us, "Help, it hurts." Some companions, like cats, are notorious for hiding their pain (too well), so September 's Animal Pain Awareness Month is the perfect opportunity to refresh on cat pain basics.

“Because Their Pain Is Our Pain"

The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) launched Animal Pain Awareness Month in the hopes that more pet guardians learn about and recognize pain in their pets. The tagline “Because Their Pain Is Our Pain" http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/veterinary-group-targets-september-animal-pain-awareness-month reinforces that our companion animals aren 't immune to the acute and chronic pains that so many of us are familiar with. For instance, the FDA http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm382772.htm recently discussed how feline osteoarthritis is becoming much more common in cats.

Unlike other companions, it 's hard for a cat to show their pain. Evolution is working against well-meaning guardians. According to the Okaw Veterinary Clinic, http://www.okawvetclinic.com/why-cats-hide-pain.pml as both predators and prey, disguising pain can save a cat 's life: "The easiest prey for a predator to kill is the sick or injured one." As solitary creatures, they don 't have the protection of a pack either.

Signs that Your Cat is in Pain

So it 's up to your kitty (and you) to keep them alive. Here are a few…
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